Archives: Publishers Weekly

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A regular Friday feature of CCC’s podcast series, “The Publishing Week Ahead With Publishers Weekly” previews the news that publishers, editors, authors, agents and librarians will be talking about when they return to work on Monday. CCC’s Chris Kenneally checks in with Andrew Albanese, PW’s Features Editor, as well as a range of PW writers, experts and editors.


Publishers Weekly is the leading publication serving all involved in the creation, production, marketing and sale of the written word in all formats.

Riggio Retires

Over a half century of business transformation and reinvention, one figure has persisted in the book trade. Len Riggio, the founder and chairman of Barnes & Noble, built a bookselling empire that remains the nation’s largest – even if it also the last of its kind. This week, the 75-year-old Riggio announced the next step […]

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“Books Case” Comes To End

The path leading to the marble steps of the United States Supreme Court building demands patience from all parties. When at last the journey ends, the justices offer no consolation other than their opinions. On Monday this week, the long road ended for the Authors Guild in their copyright infringement case against Google. That suit […]

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Book At Brexit Time

It was a week of comings and goings at the London Book Fair 2016. For one thing — and no one minded — the clouds and rain early in the week departed in time for the highlight days of the show. But talk of another leaving gave many publishers pause: In June, the British public votes […]

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Copyright Cases Roll On

The US Congress writes the copyright laws of the land, and the interpretation is left to the courts. “Fair use” is a potential defense where  copyright infringement is charged, and a judge must measure four explicit factors when assessing possible harm. Fair use gets a fair amount of attention in the Digital Age, and this […]

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E-Book Pioneers Thriving

The world of e-books is like the American west – full of wide open spaces and populated with pioneers. Names like Open Road, Diversion and Brown Girls Books dot the map. Open Road Integrated Media, established in 2009, releases about 200 e-books a month, focusing on the backlists of more than 2,000 authors, including such […]

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Game Over For Kids Ebooks?

An epic tale? Well, hardly – but the rise and fall of the e-book may the year’s most critical story for trade book publishers. What lies behind the decline in e-book sales is hardly mysterious – one of the big 5 publishers has flatly pointed to “new retail sales terms” – yet sharp fall in […]

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A Surprise Waiting At The Public Library

What’s surprising about public libraries today is that they are more about offering access than acting as archives. In the US, too, the public library is increasingly a community’s home away from home. Ahead of the biannual Public Library Association Conference, coming to Denver, April 5–9, Andrew Albanese, Publishers Weekly senior writer, learned about the […]

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Apple Loses, Readers Win

In New York at the Digital Book World Conference, the Four Horsemen rode onto the center stage. But predictions of imminent apocalypse were likely overstated. One path to short-term salvation for the book business may be the pot of gold at the end of the Apple e-books price-fixing case. On Friday, March 4, the Supreme […]

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Take Two For Hachette, Perseus And Ingram

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. The 2014 deal for Hachette to purchase Perseus eventually fell apart, but the parties announced this week they’re ready for “take two” on the deal. On Tuesday, Hachette – the publisher of novelists Donna Tartt and Nicholas Sparks, among many other bestselling authors – said it […]

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One More Senate Battle Ahead?

This week, President Obama nominated Carla Hayden to become the 14th Librarian of Congress. The selection follows the January retirement of James Billington, a Reagan appointee who came to office in 1987. Hayden will replace David Mao, who currently serves as the library’s interim director. The Senate, however, must approve the choice, as Andrew Albanese, […]

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